Parents should know the difference between being naughty and being recalcitrant

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The joy of becoming a parent is overwhelming. As your cupcakes grow, you got to have a lot of patience besides your care, guidance and, protection in preparing them to be self-reliant, responsible, capable, confident and, mature individuals so they are ready to face the world independently.

At some point in time, there could be instances when it gets pretty tough to handle your bumblebees, especially, when there is a sudden outburst of temper tantrums or they get too stubborn and just don't want to listen to you.

We need to understand that childhood is all together, a completely different phase of life. At times, we, as a parent, often mistake visualizing our kids like mini-adults and expect them to behave like us, mature adults!

So, how do you handle your little blooming buds and differentiate them from being naughty and being recalcitrant? Well, MommyPure is all here to guide and assist you with the finest tips and techniques in understanding and handling such situations/ episodes.

Here we go,

  • Let you be the decision-maker

It is normal for a child to ask for every little thing that he/she may get attracted to, like toys, storybooks, gadgets, etc. But you have to decide what is needed for him and any denial should be explained very lovingly with proper reasoning. Neither succumb to their request nor be scornful. Also never end up punishing them.

  • Do not fulfill every demand

Kids are smart. Once they understand that they can always have what they ask for, it ends up getting habitual. A common instance is a kid asking for his favorite toy in a mall and your denial. The result, screeching, yelling, rolling on the floor, etc. A big scene creation! Do not give in. A little deviation will make them confident winners. Divert their attention, get your partner to move him away from the location, or just be stern that you may have to leave right away. But never leave them alone. Once back to normalcy, be vocal that such behaviors shall not be tolerated. You can even cultivate a habit of a training session on expected behaviors before such events

  • Avoid Punishments

Little buds can go out of control at times. Once you lose your temper, it is common to shout/get angry/even punish a child, especially physical punishments. Avoid punishments as it may leave a bad scar in their delicate minds and can even affect their emotional upbringing. Explain the impact they or others could have because of their bad behaviors or actions. Make them understand their mistakes and show them examples where, when, and how they can correct themselves.

  • Maintain the continuity

If you have set certain rules, ensure it’s maintained. E.g. an outdoor playtime schedule has to be constant or watching the favorite video has to be timed for specific hours. Conflicting limits at your convenience can confuse them and end up in their misbehaviors at a later stage.

  • Always remember to reward or praise              

Pay attention to all their sweet little efforts. Nurture their self-esteem, praise their confidence and capabilities. We, adults, make mistakes. Our bees are still so tender in age. Never criticize/compare/insult them in front of anybody. Avoid materialistic rewards. A gentle kiss, a warm cuddle, a loving hug, their favorite dish, or an outing of their favored location on weekend can also work wonders. Show them your presence, your attention, and unconditional love and care in all their walk of life. Spending quality time with them could be the most rewarding one at times.

 

Your wonder-buds are still in the exploration mode of their whole new World with you ?! Just treat them as individuals, understand their needs (not demands) and fulfill them, but with good morals and values. Remember, their first role model is you. Your behaviors can have a direct impact on their fostering.

Make parenting a cherishable moment for you and wonderful growing years for your cupcakes.

Happy Parenting!

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